Blues Dancing

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Blues Dancing

<p>BLUES dancing is a family of historical dances that developed alongside and were danced to blues music, or the contemporary dances that are danced in that aesthetic. </p><p>The revival of Lindy Hop

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BLUES dancing is a family of historical dances that developed alongside and were danced to blues music, or the contemporary dances that are danced in that aesthetic.

The revival of Lindy Hop in the 1980s and 1990s has prompted complementary interests in other dances from Black vernacular dance traditions of the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s. In America Lindy hop today, after the revival, Lindy exchanges, with their emphasis on late night programs of social dance events, saw the introduction of “blues rooms” to these events in the late 1990s. While the amount of Blues music played at these events varied widely the name and what Blues music was being played led to dancers patronizing blues music clubs and holding house parties that played a varying amounts of blues and blues-rooted music. In the late 1980s the Herräng Dance Camp began featuring an all-night “Blues Night” dancing party on Wednesday nights (later Tuesdays), which exposed swing dancers from all over the world to the idea of slow dancing to blues, jazz, and early rhythm & blues. Due to a policy of playing only Jazz instead of Blues, Herräng Dance Camp eventually changed the name of the slow night to “Slow Drag” (though Slow Drag (dance) is itself already a name of an unrelated historical dance)

The CAROLINA SHAG is a partner dance done primarily to Beach Music (100-130+ beats per minute). Today, the Shag is a recognized dance in national and international dance competitions held across the United States.

The basic step in Carolina Shag is a six-count, eight-step pattern danced in a slot. The rhythm is similar to six-count Swing in that it is triple step, triple step, rock step or counted as “one-and-two, three-and-four, five-six”. There are eight shag dance steps. The “one-and-two” and “three-and-four” steps should take about as much time to complete as the "five-six."

Carolina Shag often bears only the faintest resemblance to other dances that share the “shag” designation.